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Thursday, May 28 • 11:35am - 1:05pm
Teaching the Digital Humanities for Under-Prepared Students (and Faculty)

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Many of our students, especially but not exclusively those in professional programs, come to us with little background in or appreciation for the humanities. Perhaps in consequence, they also have little facility with the resources, tools, and techniques of humanistic scholarship. As teachers, our challenge is to guide these outsiders through the codes and practices of an unfamiliar culture, inviting and equipping them to be responsible citizens - or at least congenial neighbors.

All of us in this session, as historians, philosophers, religious scholars, and sociologists, have found digital resources and strategies to be of at least some help in this project. In the process, like our students we too are adapting reluctantly or eagerly, partially or comprehensively, to a world in which virtually all historical thought and knowledge can fit on a device in our pockets; where memory has become almost seamlessly prosthetic, and the skills of discovery and interpretation are more than ever decisive. And like our students we ask how much of this stuff has real value and how much is a waste of our time and energy. Our knowledges and practices are unsettled - we are experimenting, it seems permanently. Variously we blog, wiki, and tweet; construct mind maps; build virtual histories; access digital archives and databases; flip the classroom with video and e-research teams; draft and peer review papers by electronic submission.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Dyke

Carl Dyke

Professor of History, Methodist University
I teach mostly introductory world history, as well as seminars on modern Europe in / and the world, Latin America, race and ethnicity, classical and contemporary social theory, and gender. Research interests include Gramsci, Durkheim, Weber, and the history of complex systems theory in the human studies; identity formation; and the pedagogy of complex systems. I have a group blog, https://deadvoles.wordpress.com/, and a pedagogy and assessment... Read More →
avatar for Patrick O'Neil

Patrick O'Neil

Assistant Professor of History, Methodist University
Patrick W. O'Neil (B.A., Grinnell College; PhD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) studies gender, culture, and politics in antebellum America. His research focuses on how Americans' ideas about rituals and cultural artifacts unite and divide them; his current book project is entitled Inventing the American Wedding. His teaching asks that students do research and think hard about it. He was named Methodist University's Distinguished... Read More →

Designated Tweeters
avatar for Donnie Sendelbach

Donnie Sendelbach

Director of Instructional and Learning Services/Information Technology Associates Program, DePauw University
Donnie Sendelbach is the Director of Instructional and Learning Services, which provides instructional technology support for faculty and students at DePauw University. She also served at the Director of the Information Technology Associates Program. Previously, she supported instructional technology, especially in the Humanities, at Lake Forest College, where she co-directed the NEH-funded Virtual Burnham Initiative, and Lawrence University... Read More →
MM

Megan Myers

@MeganJMyers


Thursday May 28, 2015 11:35am - 1:05pm
Brody Square

Attendees (63)